Changes to the Member Dashboard

Change is rarely a welcomed thing, but is necessary at times.

  1. Your Account PROFILE has been moved. It used to be on the right side of the Dashboard, and now it will be a small link in the upper right hand corner of the screen.
  2. WHAT’S NEW has also moved, from the top to the Dashboard over to the right side.  These are the multi-colored tiles that list the New ADs, SBs, FARs, TCDs, and ACs.
  3. Customizable Dashboard (to some extent).  Choose what you want to see most.  For example: if you use Work Orders, but not Invoices, you can remove that panel from your Dashboard.

To Customize your Dashboard:

Click the link at the top right that says “Show/Hide/Order“.

This take you to the Customize My Dashboard page.  It allows you to move the center display sections around in whatever order you like.

What are the sections?  My Aircraft, My Reports, My Forms, My Work Orders, My Invoices.

You are accustom to seeing “My AD Compliance Reports” as the top section.  Now, at the top with the new Dashboard changes, “My Aircraft” is at the top by default, but you can change that, and put “My AD Compliance Reports” back to the top if you like.

For Example:  you can mark My Reports as number 1, and move My Aircraft to number 2, if you like.

Check the boxes to remove any section you do not want to see.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hope you find these changes easy to adjust to, and we welcome your feedback.   Please let us know if you need help, or have any questions.

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

IA Renewals – FAA Requirements

Inspection Authorization – IA

Inspection authorization (IA), FAA requirements

Sec. 65.91
 

Inspection authorization.

(a) An application for an inspection authorization is made on a form and in a manner prescribed by the Administrator.

(b) An applicant who meets the requirements of this section is entitled to an inspection authorization.

(c) To be eligible for an inspection authorization, an applicant must—

(1) Hold a currently effective mechanic certificate with both an airframe rating and a powerplant rating, each of which is currently effective and has been in effect for a total of at least 3 years;

(2) Have been actively engaged, for at least the 2-year period before the date he applies, in maintaining aircraft certificated and maintained in accordance with this chapter;

(3) Have a fixed base of operations at which he may be located in person or by telephone during a normal working week but it need not be the place where he will exercise his inspection authority;

(4) Have available to him the equipment, facilities, and inspection data necessary to properly inspect airframes, powerplants, propellers, or any related part or appliance; and

(5) Pass a written test on his ability to inspect according to safety standards for returning aircraft to service after major repairs and major alterations and annual and progressive inspections performed under part 43 of this chapter.

An applicant who fails the test prescribed in paragraph (c)(5) of this section may not apply for retesting until at least 90 days after the date he failed the test.

 

Sec. 65.92

Inspection authorization: Duration.

(a) Each inspection authorization expires on March 31 of each odd-numbered year. However, the holder may exercise the privileges of that authorization only while he holds a currently effective mechanic certificate with both a currently effective airframe rating and a currently effective powerplant rating.

(b) An inspection authorization ceases to be effective whenever any of the following occurs:

(1) The authorization is surrendered, suspended, or revoked.

(2) The holder no longer has a fixed base of operation.

(3) The holder no longer has the equipment, facilities, and inspection data required by §65.91(c) (3) and (4) for issuance of his authorization.

(c) The holder of an inspection authorization that is suspended or revoked shall, upon the Administrator’s request, return it to the Administrator.

 

Sec. 65.93

Inspection authorization: Renewal.

(a) To be eligible for renewal of an inspection authorization for a 2-year period an applicant must present evidence during the month of March of each odd-numbered year, at an FAA Flight Standards District Office or an International Field Office, that the applicant still meets the requirements of §65.91(c) (1) through (4). In addition, during the time the applicant held the inspection authorization, the applicant must show completion of one of the activities in §65.93(a) (1) through (5) below by March 31 of the first year of the 2-year inspection authorization period, and completion of one of the five activities during the second year of the 2-year period:

(1) Performed at least one annual inspection for each 90 days that the applicant held the current authority; or

(2) Performed at least two major repairs or major alterations for each 90 days that the applicant held the current authority; or

(3) Performed or supervised and approved at least one progressive inspection in accordance with standards prescribed by the Administrator; or

(4) Attended and successfully completed a refresher course, acceptable to the Administrator, of not less than 8 hours of instruction; or

(5) Passed an oral test by an FAA inspector to determine that the applicant’s knowledge of applicable regulations and standards is current.

(b) The holder of an inspection authorization that has been in effect:

(1) for less than 90 days before the expiration date need not comply with paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section.

(2) for less than 90 days before March 31 of an even-numbered year need not comply with paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section for the first year of the 2-year inspection authorization period.

(c) An inspection authorization holder who does not complete one of the activities set forth in §65.93(a) (1) through (5) of this section by March 31 of the first year of the 2-year inspection authorization period may not exercise inspection authorization privileges after March 31 of the first year. The inspection authorization holder may resume exercising inspection authorization privileges after passing an oral test from an FAA inspector to determine that the applicant’s knowledge of the applicable regulations and standards is current. An inspection authorization holder who passes this oral test is deemed to have completed the requirements of §65.93(a) (1) through (5) by March 31 of the first year.

 

Sec. 65.95

Inspection authorization: Privileges and limitations.

(a) The holder of an inspection authorization may—

(1) Inspect and approve for return to service any aircraft or related part or appliance (except any aircraft maintained in accordance with a continuous airworthiness program under part 121 of this chapter) after a major repair or major alteration to it in accordance with part 43 [New] of this chapter, if the work was done in accordance with technical data approved by the Administrator; and

(2) Perform an annual, or perform or supervise a progressive inspection according to §§43.13 and 43.15 of this chapter.

(b) When he exercises the privileges of an inspection authorization the holder shall keep it available for inspection by the aircraft owner, the mechanic submitting the aircraft, repair, or alteration for approval (if any), and shall present it upon the request of the Administrator or an authorized representative of the National Transportation Safety Board, or of any Federal, State, or local law enforcement officer.

(c) If the holder of an inspection authorization changes his fixed base of operation, he may not exercise the privileges of the authorization until he has notified the FAA Flight Standards District Office or International Field Office for the area in which the new base is located, in writing, of the change.

Source:  Airframe and Powerplant.com

Related Links: IA Activity Report (for Evidence of Work Performed)

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

 

Piper AD 20-26-16 Wing Separation by Main Spar Cap Fatigue Cracking

If you missed it, here’s another Piper AD that is getting some attention, AD 20-26-16:

Subject:  Wing Separation by Main Spar Cap Fatigue Cracking

Models Affected:

Model Serial numbers
PA-28-151 All serial numbers
PA-28-161 l serial numbers except 2842006
PA-28-181 All serial numbers
PA-28-235 All serial numbers
PA-28R-180 All serial numbers
PA-28R-200 All serial numbers except 28R-7235151
PA-28R-201 All serial numbers except 2844029, 2844030, 2844081, 2844125, 2844136, 2844147 through 2844151, 28R-7737078, 28R-7737142, 28R-7837108, 28R-7837125, and 28R-7837257
PA-28R-201T All serial numbers
PA-28RT-201 All serial numbers
PA-28RT-201T All serial numbers
PA-32-260 All serial numbers
PA-32-300 All serial numbers
PA-32R-300 All serial numbers
PA-32RT-300 All serial numbers except 32R-7985004
PA-32RT-300T All serial numbers

There is a Form attached to the AD that requires submission:

Appendix 1:  Inspection Results Form

This is a long AD with a lot of reading.   To Login and view the AD, click here:

https://www.airworthinessdirectives.com/Members/AD/ViewAD/20-26-16

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Print the Appliance List in an AD Report

Good day and good news!

By popular request, the option to print the Appliance list within an AD Reports is now available.

To view this option:
1) Open an existing AD Report that contains Appliances.
2) One the left panel, click Print Layout Options, then select Appliance List.
It’s new, and untested, so please let us know if you run into any snags.

We hope you find this feature useful.  Your suggestions, and patience is appreciated, as we gradually work towards continued product improvement.

Let us know if you have any questions as you use the new print feature.

Thank you.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes

For those who like to cook, you might enjoy these recipes, based on WW II culinary creations, when riveting was job #1 of the ladies, and cooking took on a whole new form.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes: WW2 Home Front Cooking & Baking

“Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WW 2, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives a glimpse into life on the WW 2 home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one with more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War 2 ration recipes with short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.”

Rosie's Riveting Recipes: WW2 Home Front Cooking & Baking by [Gayle Martin, Cynthia Roedig]

Available on Kindle or Paperback, from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01HE24SX6/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0

Merry Christmas 2020

Wishing you the peace and joy of the holiday season!

During the holiday season, our thoughts turn gratefully to those who have made our success possible. It is in this spirit that we say thank you and hope you stay safe and healthy. Merry Christmas to you and yours. May your days be merry and bright.
If it is on your heart to give, there are so many missions that serve those in need. If you don’t have a local group, please consider one of our aviation mission friends. Here’s are a few that would be grateful for your contribution:
Wishing you and yours good health and blessings this Christmas season!
Our offices will be closed on Christmas Day and New year’s Day. In case of emergency, leave a voicemail or send an email. Messages will be checked occasionally over the holiday.
Thank you, God bless, stay well and enjoy the spirit of the season!

Merry Christmas from all of us here at Zook Aviation!

✈ Happy Wright Brothers Day! ✈

✈ Happy Wright Brothers Day! ✈
 
On December 17, 1903, the Wright brothers took flight with their first powered aircraft in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.
 
The brothers took their manned gliding experiments to Kitty Hawk because the mid-Atlantic coast had stable breezes and soft sandy surfaces, perfect for landing those initial tests.
 
The Wrights determined the best location for their initial test flights by writing to the Weather Bureau, now known as the National Weather Service.
 
Joseph J Dosher, who worked at the Weather Bureau, promptly replied with the following response:
 
“Mr Wilbur Wright Dayton Ohio
 
Dear Sir,
 
In reply to yours of the 3rd, I will say the beach here is about one mile wide clear of trees or high hills, and islands for nearly sixty miles south. Conditions: the wind blows mostly from the North and Northeast September and October which is nearly down this piece of land. Giving you many miles of a steady wind with a free sweep. I am sorry to say that you could not rent a house here. So you will have to bring tents. You could obtain frame.
 
The only way to reach Kitty Hawk is from Manteo Roanoke Island N.C. in a small sail boat. From your letter I believe you would find it here like you wish. Will be pleased at any time to give you any information. Yours very respectfully JJ. Dosher”
 
The brothers’ first flight lasted 12 seconds and flew 120 feet. That day, they flew the glider three more times. Wilbur flew for the longest time that day, lasting 59 seconds over a distance of 852 feet.
 
Wilbur Wright testing a glider in Kitty Hawk, Oct. 10, 1902. Courtesy: National Weather Service
 
Once the flights were completed, Orville walked to the Kitty Hawk Weather Office to send a telegraph to his father, telling him about the day’s successes.
 
The telegraph sent by Orville Wright from the Weather Bureau Office in Kitty Hawk. The message informs their father about the successful flights of Dec. 17, 1903. Courtesy: National Weather Service
text
 
Listen to today’s episode of “This Day In Weather History” to hear more about the lead up the first aviation weather forecast, which occurred on Dec. 1, 1918.
 
The relationship between the National Weather Service and the aviation industry continues to be strong, providing daily weather forecasts for 537 airports.
 

My Aircraft: Add an Experimental in My Aircraft

Need to Add an Experimental Aircraft?

To add an Experimental aircraft, to My Aircraft:
1. Login to the Member’s Dashboard:  1) click My Aircraft, then 2) click Create New Aircraft:

2. Type Exp into the model field, and click Search.

3. Click the dot on the right side, then click the Select an Airframe and Click Here button:

 

 

Nothing will exist in the record, so be sure to add all the information you can, such as N# (Tail) and Serial Number, and the Name of the Aircraft:

 

 

 

 

 

 

IS THE PROFILE COMPLETE?

Once you’ve set up the Aircraft Profile, you can do a number of other things, like:

      1. Add a Photo.
      2. Add a Customer.
      3. Create a new, or link to an existing: AD Report, Logbook Entry, Weight Form, 337, ICA Work Order, or Invoice.

 

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Do your exhaust ports look like this? by Dean Showalter

Sharing another great article with you here, from our friend, Dean Showalter:

Hi Friends!

I’m a firm believer in using pressure testing to check for exhaust leaks.

But I wasn’t always.

Years ago, we rarely did more than visual inspections on exhaust systems.

Since that time, I’ve changed my ways… and I’m glad I did.

Check out this exhaust port on a cylinder:​

Before removing the exhaust pipe that was attached here, it didn’t look that bad.

But by doing a simple pressure test with a clean shop vac and some soapy water, it became obvious it was leaking.

If these types of exhaust leaks are not fixed, the cylinder flange area can erode, making cylinder replacement necessary.

For this cylinder, the exhaust port cleaned up nicely, 2 new studs were installed, and the exhaust pipe flange was resurfaced and reinstalled with a new gasket.

The result: No more leakage!

For more pictures of the exhaust repairs and other interesting squawks on my friend Tobin’s Piper Cherokee Six, check out the notes for episode 161 of the Airplane Owner Maintenance podcast.

You can see all the pictures and notes here: AirplaneOwnerMaintenance.com/161

Be sure to tune in early on Thanksgiving morning for a special episode…

I’m going to introduce my good friend, Jonathan Brush, who was a huge motivator in pushing me to start the podcast.

And… I’ll share a code for a special price on the “Safety Wire Like A Pro!” video course, that will be available for one week, starting on Thanksgiving Day.

Have a great week Friends!

Dean

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

My Aircraft: Create a New Aircraft Profile with My Aircraft

There are several ways to create a NEW Aircraft Profile:

      1. From the Aircraft Registry (preferred and recommended), or
      2. From the My Aircraft menu (slower, more steps).

We’ll show you BOTH methods, starting with MY AIRCRAFT:

It’s easy to create your first record in “My Aircraft”.  Here’s how:

Login to the Member’s Dashboard:  1) click My Aircraft, then 2) click Create New Aircraft:

Next, type in the model number, and click Search:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Choose the specific model from the list, and tap the Select an Airframe button:

 

 

SERIAL NUMBER FORMAT WARNING:

At times, you may get a Serial Number warning (in red print). All this means is that you need to click the Edit button and change the Serial Number format to match the exact format description, such as this:

 

IS THE PROFILE COMPLETE?

Once you’ve set up the Aircraft Profile, you can do a number of other things, like:

      1. See what Regulations apply, including ADs, Service Documents (SBs), AMAs, STCs, or Suggested Appliances.
      2. Add a Photo.
      3. Add a Customer.
      4. Create a new, or link to an existing: AD Report, Logbook Entry, Weight Form, 337, ICA Work Order, or Invoice.
      5. Not all, but some profiles will also display Aircraft Accident / Incident information.  You can learn more about that here:  https://zookaviation.com/blog/2020/06/23/addition-of-aircraft-accident-incident-data/

That was one way to start a Profile.  Here’s the other method by going directly through the REGISTRY (faster and recommended):

My Aircraft: Create a New Aircraft Profile with the Registry

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.