Merry Christmas 2020

Wishing you the peace and joy of the holiday season!

During the holiday season, our thoughts turn gratefully to those who have made our success possible. It is in this spirit that we say thank you and hope you stay safe and healthy. Merry Christmas to you and yours. May your days be merry and bright.
If it is on your heart to give, there are so many missions that serve those in need. If you don’t have a local group, please consider one of our aviation mission friends. Here’s are a few that would be grateful for your contribution:
Wishing you and yours good health and blessings this Christmas season!
Our offices will be closed on Christmas Day and New year’s Day. In case of emergency, leave a voicemail or send an email. Messages will be checked occasionally over the holiday.
Thank you, God bless, stay well and enjoy the spirit of the season!

Merry Christmas from all of us here at Zook Aviation!

✈ Happy Wright Brothers Day! ✈

✈ Happy Wright Brothers Day! ✈
 
On December 17, 1903, the Wright brothers took flight with their first powered aircraft in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.
 
The brothers took their manned gliding experiments to Kitty Hawk because the mid-Atlantic coast had stable breezes and soft sandy surfaces, perfect for landing those initial tests.
 
The Wrights determined the best location for their initial test flights by writing to the Weather Bureau, now known as the National Weather Service.
 
Joseph J Dosher, who worked at the Weather Bureau, promptly replied with the following response:
 
“Mr Wilbur Wright Dayton Ohio
 
Dear Sir,
 
In reply to yours of the 3rd, I will say the beach here is about one mile wide clear of trees or high hills, and islands for nearly sixty miles south. Conditions: the wind blows mostly from the North and Northeast September and October which is nearly down this piece of land. Giving you many miles of a steady wind with a free sweep. I am sorry to say that you could not rent a house here. So you will have to bring tents. You could obtain frame.
 
The only way to reach Kitty Hawk is from Manteo Roanoke Island N.C. in a small sail boat. From your letter I believe you would find it here like you wish. Will be pleased at any time to give you any information. Yours very respectfully JJ. Dosher”
 
The brothers’ first flight lasted 12 seconds and flew 120 feet. That day, they flew the glider three more times. Wilbur flew for the longest time that day, lasting 59 seconds over a distance of 852 feet.
 
Wilbur Wright testing a glider in Kitty Hawk, Oct. 10, 1902. Courtesy: National Weather Service
 
Once the flights were completed, Orville walked to the Kitty Hawk Weather Office to send a telegraph to his father, telling him about the day’s successes.
 
The telegraph sent by Orville Wright from the Weather Bureau Office in Kitty Hawk. The message informs their father about the successful flights of Dec. 17, 1903. Courtesy: National Weather Service
text
 
Listen to today’s episode of “This Day In Weather History” to hear more about the lead up the first aviation weather forecast, which occurred on Dec. 1, 1918.
 
The relationship between the National Weather Service and the aviation industry continues to be strong, providing daily weather forecasts for 537 airports.
 

My Aircraft: Add an Experimental in My Aircraft

Need to Add an Experimental Aircraft?

To add an Experimental aircraft, to My Aircraft:
1. Login to the Member’s Dashboard:  1) click My Aircraft, then 2) click Create New Aircraft:

2. Type Exp into the model field, and click Search.

3. Click the dot on the right side, then click the Select an Airframe and Click Here button:

 

 

Nothing will exist in the record, so be sure to add all the information you can, such as N# (Tail) and Serial Number, and the Name of the Aircraft:

 

 

 

 

 

 

IS THE PROFILE COMPLETE?

Once you’ve set up the Aircraft Profile, you can do a number of other things, like:

      1. Add a Photo.
      2. Add a Customer.
      3. Create a new, or link to an existing: AD Report, Logbook Entry, Weight Form, 337, ICA Work Order, or Invoice.

 

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Do your exhaust ports look like this? by Dean Showalter

Sharing another great article with you here, from our friend, Dean Showalter:

Hi Friends!

I’m a firm believer in using pressure testing to check for exhaust leaks.

But I wasn’t always.

Years ago, we rarely did more than visual inspections on exhaust systems.

Since that time, I’ve changed my ways… and I’m glad I did.

Check out this exhaust port on a cylinder:​

Before removing the exhaust pipe that was attached here, it didn’t look that bad.

But by doing a simple pressure test with a clean shop vac and some soapy water, it became obvious it was leaking.

If these types of exhaust leaks are not fixed, the cylinder flange area can erode, making cylinder replacement necessary.

For this cylinder, the exhaust port cleaned up nicely, 2 new studs were installed, and the exhaust pipe flange was resurfaced and reinstalled with a new gasket.

The result: No more leakage!

For more pictures of the exhaust repairs and other interesting squawks on my friend Tobin’s Piper Cherokee Six, check out the notes for episode 161 of the Airplane Owner Maintenance podcast.

You can see all the pictures and notes here: AirplaneOwnerMaintenance.com/161

Be sure to tune in early on Thanksgiving morning for a special episode…

I’m going to introduce my good friend, Jonathan Brush, who was a huge motivator in pushing me to start the podcast.

And… I’ll share a code for a special price on the “Safety Wire Like A Pro!” video course, that will be available for one week, starting on Thanksgiving Day.

Have a great week Friends!

Dean

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Create a New Aircraft Profile by Model Search

There are several ways to create a NEW Aircraft Profile:

      1. By N-Number Search, or
      2. By Model Search

We’ll show you BOTH methods.

Login to the Member’s Dashboard:  1) click Aircraft Profiles, then 2) click Create New Aircraft:

 

 

 

 

 

To Search by N-Number, click the “Search by N#” button:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Type in the N-Number and click Search:   *Click the blue arrow to open the Registry listing:

On the next screen, click the +Add to Aircraft Profile button:

 

 

Alternatively, you can also search by MODEL:  type in the model number, and click Search:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Choose the specific model from the list, and tap the Select an Airframe button:

 

 

SERIAL NUMBER FORMAT WARNING:

At times, you may get a Serial Number warning (in red print). All this means is that you need to click the Edit button and change the Serial Number format to match the exact format description, such as this:

 

IS THE PROFILE COMPLETE?

Once you’ve set up the Aircraft Profile, you can do a number of other things, like:

      1. See what Regulations apply, including ADs, Service Documents (SBs), AMAs, STCs, or Suggested Appliances.
      2. Add a Photo.
      3. Add a Customer.
      4. Create a new, or link to an existing: AD Report, Logbook Entry, Weight Form, 337, ICA Work Order, or Invoice.
      5. Not all, but some profiles will also display Aircraft Accident / Incident information.  You can learn more about that here:  https://zookaviation.com/blog/2020/06/23/addition-of-aircraft-accident-incident-data/

That was one way to start a Profile.  Here’s the other method by going directly through the REGISTRY (faster and recommended):

My Aircraft: Create a New Aircraft Profile with the Registry

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Piper AD 20-24-05 Wing Spar Corrosion

Just in case you missed it, we want you to know about Piper AD 20-24-05 Wing Spar Corrosion.

The AD effects these 7 models:

        • PA-28-140
        • PA-28-150
        • PA-28-160
        • PA-28-180
        • PA-28-235
        • PA-32-260
        • PA-32-300

It is Recurring, and is effective Dec 28, 2020.

The unsafe condition is listed as:

“This AD was prompted by reports of corrosion found in an area of the main wing spar not easily accessible for inspection. The FAA is issuing this AD to detect and correct corrosion in the wing root area of the left and the right main wing spars. Corrosion of the main wing spar, if not detected and corrected, could cause the main wing spar to fail with consequent loss of control of the airplane.”

If you feel this AD affects your work, please LOGIN to the AD Toolbox and view the AD here:

https://www.airworthinessdirectives.com/Members/AD/ViewAD/20-24-05

There is a Piper Service Bulletin referenced in the AD;  Piper SB 1304A:

https://www.airworthinessdirectives.com/Members/SB/Piper_1304A.pdf

Here is the link for a different Piper AD, also relating to Wing Spar, but with entirely different models (PA-28-151, PA-28-161, PA-28-181, PA-28-235, PA-28R-180, PA-28R-200, PA-28R-201, PA-28R-201T, PA-28RT-201, PA-28RT-201T, PA-32-260, PA-32-300, PA-32R-300, PA-32RT-300, PA-32RT-300T):

https://www.airworthinessdirectives.com/Members/AD/ViewAD/20-26-16

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Related Articles:

https://zookaviation.com/blog/2019/02/05/piper-pa-28-32-main-wing-spar-corrosion/

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Converting, Importing, Transferring External Documents

Customers often ask: “Can you import my Reports from XYZ into your system?”

Whatever you prefer to call it:  “converting, transferring, or importing”, we do NOT currently offer that service, however, there is a work around, IF you still have the digital versions of your external documents.

What’s the work around?  Have you ever used the Copy & Paste functions on your keyboard?  If so, this should be fairly simple for you.

If you still have access to the digital version of your external documents, open TWO Windows:

      1. The AD Toolbox, and
      2. Your external documents, whether it be via browser, or opening a PDF, Word or Excel window.

Create a New document within the AD Toolbox (can be a Logbook Entry, AD Report, Weight & Balance Form, etc).

Copy the data from the external document, and Paste it into the correct field in your new AD Toolbox document.

If you don’t know how to Copy & Paste, here’s a quick intro, using keyboard functions:

On a PC:

Copy is:  CTRL C

Paste is:  CTRL V

See the source image

On a Mac:

Copy is:  Command C

See the source image

Paste is:  Command V

See the source image

Give this a try and let us know how it’s worked for you.  Copy & paste is a great tool, no matter what you might be working on.  We hope this helps get your external records moved over.

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

New Form: ZA-AD201801J

When reading AD 20-18-01, applicable to a vast number of Cessna’s, you will note that Paragraph J explains the Reporting requirements, seen here:


(j) Reporting Requirement

Within 30 days after the effective date of this AD, or within 30 days after completing the initial inspection required by paragraph (g) of this AD, whichever occurs later, report the findings of the initial inspection (regardless if cracks were found or not) to the FAA at Wichita-COS@faa.gov. Thereafter, within 30 days after completing each repetitive inspection required by paragraph (h) of this AD, if any crack was found, report the crack findings to the FAA at Wichita-COS@faa.gov. Include in your reports the following information:

(1) Name and address of the owner;
(2) Date of the inspection;
(3) Name, address, telephone number, and email address of the person submitting the report;
(4) Airplane serial number and total hours TIS on the airplane at the time of the inspection; and (5) If any crack was found during the inspection, provide detailed crack information as specified below:
(i) A sketch or picture detailing the crack location;
(ii) Measured length of the crack(s) found;
(iii) Installation of a Cessna service kit or any other kit or repair before the inspection; and

(iv) Installation of any supplemental type certificates (STCs), alterations, repairs, or field approvals affecting the area of concern or affecting gross weight.


In response to a customer’s request, we broke the AD’s paragraph J out into Form style, so you can answer all the questions and turn the Report in, as required.

Login and go to Forms > FAA/Custom Forms and scroll to the bottom of the page.

Let us know if you have any questions or  comments!

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

AD Reports: Print by Category

Ever want to just print a specific category of your AD Report?  Such as just the Airframe, and nothing else, or just the Engines?
In this example, we’re showing how to print Appliances only:
When in an AD Report, look to the left panel, there you will see “Print Options”.
Click that and choose “Print by Category”.
Locate the Filter by Category area, and select “Appliances” in the drop down list. Click Filter.
Next, choose your Print Layout, and lastly, click the Print button.

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Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday/IA Seminars, Saturday & Sunday:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Make an Appliance or Component Only AD Report

If you’d like to make an Appliance or Component-Only AD Report, it’s fairly simple, here’s how:

From the Member’s Dashboard, on the Left Panel:

    1. Click AD & TCD Search.  That will open a list.
    2. Click Appliance AD
    3. In the upper right hand corner, click the blue +Create Blank Report (No ADs) button.

When the blank report opens, first click the Edit Heading link to change the name of the Report:

Delete the existing words in the Manufacturer and Model field that say “BLANK REPORT (Manufacturer and Model is editable)” and type in your own title.  It can be whatever description of the Appliance or Component that you want.  Click Save:

For this Example, we’ve typed in:  Magneto – Bendix S20 / S200

Now, Add your Appliance AD (or ADs), here’s how:

On the left side, click Add ADs/Service Documents which will open a list, then choose Add Appliance AD:

Next, 1) locate the Filter Search towards the upper right side of the list, and type in whatever you’re looking for.  You can type “magneto” or “bendix”.  Here’s we’ve typed “S-200” which narrowed our search and showed us those AD titles containing “S-200”.  2) Check off the ADs you want to add to your report. 3) Click the Add button:

The final result is an AD report that only includes the Appliances (aka Components) that you need:

 

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Have more questions? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday & Sunday:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.