Looking for an airplane – Things to consider

Looking for an airplane — Things to consider

​I bought my first Maule in 1993. It was an 1970 M-4 220 with original Razorback cover and mid time engine. I decided I would recover it with the Poly Fiber process and have it ready to go the next spring. Two and a half
years later I finally got it in the air! First bit of advice.  Don’t buy a project because you think you will save money or with the idea of making money when you sell it. Do a project if you enjoy working on airplanes. If you
want to fly. Pay a bit more, find a good sound airframe and engine, put gas in it and go flying.
So far I’ve owned the M-4 220, an M-5 235 that I modified to an M-6, and an MX7 160. All started out as projects. All took longer than I thought they would to complete. In the process I’ve gained some experience about used Maules and what to look for when buying. I’ve seen a lot of people buy a cheap airplane only to find out in a couple of years they can’t afford to  maintain it in good airworthy condition. So they lose interest and sell the airplane. Second bit of advice. It takes money to own and maintain an airplane. Be prepared for unexpected expenses and know they are part of owning an airplane.
This seems to happen most often with engine related issues. Most of the problems can be traced back to the engine sitting around for years at a time with low usage. I’d rather buy an engine that had 1500 hours on it in the last 5 years than one that is 20 years old and only has 500 hrs. total time. When I bought the MX7-160 it had 300 hrs since overhaul, 50 hrs since tear down and inspection for prop strike, but had set 2 years without flying. We did an annual inspection. It had great compression, low oil consumption and ran great for 80 hours. Then I started noticing higher oil use. To make a long story short I ended up tearing the engine down, replacing the cam and lifters, polishing the crank and honing the cylinders. The lifter faces were starting to deteriorate and little flakes of metal were floating around in the oil grinding away on all the other engine surfaces. I had changed the oil and cut the filter open three times and never found a thing to worry about. I’m sure if I had run it another 50 hours I would have needed a major over haul.
Low engine usage equals rust equals problems. If you are looking at an airplane with low time usage, take the cowling off and take a good look. What’s the condition of the cylinder base nuts and the overall appearance of the case? What does the hardware on the fire wall look like? All this has been sitting in the same environment as the internal engine parts. How can they be much different?
Most aircraft are advertised as “sold with fresh annual” or ” recent annual”. I would rather negotiate a deal where I hired a mechanic to do an annual inspection and the owner paid for the items that needed to be repaired or replaced. The sign off doesn’t mean the airplane will fly for a year with no problems.  Only that at a certain designated time someone  certified it was in airworthy condition. I once picked up an airplane with a fresh annual, hopped in and flew it a couple of hours before stopping for a rest room break. Coming back to the airplane I found oil dripping out of the cowling and a 24″ puddle of oil on the ground. After close inspection I came to the conclusion nothing major was wrong but that every gasket and seal that could leak was leaking! After two years the new owner has most of the leaks contained.
Deferred maintenance is perhaps the biggest “gotcha” of new airplane ownership. Not every previous owner or mechanic is a fraud. The mechanic is perhaps just trying to help his friend and client sell the airplane he has only flown 10 hours in the last two years. Why take the mags off for the 500 hour inspection since the engine runs and starts fine? No use to put the owner through that expense since he is selling the plane and if he keeps it he will only fly a few hours anyway. Last December I helped a client move a freshly annualed airplane from Seattle to Cut Bank. We were to head back east with it but weather got in the way and we decided to leave it in Cut Bank and continue on in the spring. Since it was here for the winter the client decided to have the local maintenance facility fix a few things so it would be ready next spring. On inspecting the spark plugs it was found that every plug failed the “go/ no go” test gauge. This was 8 hours of flight time since it had been signed off. Yes the engine started and ran OK but how long until plugs start to fail? Champion makes the test gauge for a reason.
On the other side of things remember you are purchasing a used 20, 30. or 40 year old airplane. Not everything is going to be perfect and the seller shouldn’t have to fix every little thing. You’ll have to live with some imperfections. Come to a price that will leave you some room to take care of different maintenance items you find out about but can work on later. (Look at the “second bit of advice” above.)  The other option for some is to pony up and buy a new airplane.
More Things to consider

Over the last 30 years I have been a student of all things Maule. I have purchased a couple of aircraft and have helped clients with flight training and the purchase of aircraft. There is no guarantee when purchasing a used airplane. If at all possible physically set eyes on the airplane and take a ride in it. That might be enough to make the decision to keep looking for another airplane. For the most part I would say that no matter how much research and inspecting you do there will always be mechanical problems with your “new” acquisition. Some will be easy to correct others can become a financial hardship. Over time I have come to find certain phrases in ads that flag possible future problems. Here they are in no certain order.

Sold with fresh annual  Always have a pre-purchase inspection done with a mechanic of your choice. If you can be there that is a plus. Set out what items you want looked at. If you want to pay for a full blown annual inspection that’s fine. There are items of an annual inspection set out in Ch.43 apx.D. Get a flat rate price for the inspection. Inspection means looking at the aircraft, not repairing what you find. Discrepancies can be paid for by the owner or discounted off the purchase price. Have this in a written agreement ahead of time.

All compressions in the 70s   Compression readings will tell you the rings and valves are seated and working correctly. If there is a problem only that cylinder need be repaired. That will cost some money and time but it is not out of the ordinary. It is not a good indicator of overall engine health. The real and expensive problem is internal corrosion. A borescope of the cylinders might give some indication of problems, but on the Lycoming’s there is no way to get a good look at the cam and lifters. The problem might not show up for another 70 or 80 hours. That is the expensive problem to remedy. You have to take the engine out and tear it down. If the owner has a long track record of oil analysis records that is a plus. One or two samples is not adequate.

Flown regularly  For some people that might mean once every six months! Not every flight hour is created equal. Once a week around the patch and back in the hangar is not good.  A once every six weeks, four hour cross country may be better. The best scenario is to have the engine oil temperature of 180F and held there for an hour or so to get best life out of the engine.

Author –  Rick Geiger

​I bought my first Maule in 1993. Over the years the aircraft has proven to be rugged and reliable. I have learned a few things along the way that might help you avoid some of my mistakes and expenses of owning and operating an aircraft.

*Re-posted with the author’s permission.  See original article here:

https://www.montanabyair.com/looking-for-an-airplane

Weight and Balance Forms

Did you know we offer Weight & Balance forms, as well as Revision forms?

Our W&B forms do the calculations for you, saving you time and potential mistakes. Need to make a Revision? No problem!

You can make a new form, view, edit, duplicate, convert, print, or download/save it.

WBandWBRevPrinted

There are several different ways to access the Weight & Balance Forms. 

1. From within an Aircraft Profile, in “Aircraft Profiles“:

MyAircraftWeighForms

Login now, go to your Aircraft Profiles list, and create a new, or link an existing W&B form.

2. Another way is from the left panel, on the Dashboard, under Forms:

FormsPanelView

Login now to create new, view and edit existing reports from the My Forms link.  Use the Filter Search, using keywords (like weigh, or rev) to narrow the list down.

3. A third way is in the middle section of the Member Dashboard.  There is an area just for Forms:

MyFormsDash

Login now to create new, view, or edit existing reports from the My Forms area on the Dashboard.  Use the Filter Search, using keywords (like weigh, or rev) to narrow the list down.

PlaneDividerLong

Read the NTSB‘s article:  Minding Weight, Maintaining Balance

Improper or Unperformed Calculations Can be Fatal
    1. Know your aircraft’s limitations
    2. Conduct weight and balance calculations
    3. Be prepared and conduct takeoff and landing distance calculations
    4. and more……..

NTSBWandB

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday/IA Seminars, Saturday & Sunday:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Monthly Price Plans

Subheader

As you know, we offer several different price options, but here, we’re just going to talk about our Monthly Price Plan.

Here are just a few things we’ll go over:

      1. What are the Monthly Price Plans?
      2. What are the advantages?
      3. How does it work?
      4. How do I sign up?
      5. How do I “pause” my subscription?
      6. Re-activating your account after pausing subscription.

Let’s get started:

1. What are the Monthly Price Plans?

We offer two monthly plans:

      • $49 a month plan for Single Users (One Person)
      • $59 a month Plan for Multi Users (Up to 5 People in One Shop)

2. What are the Advantages?

It takes less money to get started, and you can turn it off, and on, as needed.*

*Yes, there is a catch, but it’s simple to follow:  The Monthly Plans do require a Six-Month Minimum to fulfill, before you can turn the plan off and on, as needed.  Once that 6-month time frame is over, you’ll have option to pause your subscription.

What’s so great about that?  Well, first, it saves you money, and all your information is still there, in place, right where you left it, whether it’s a month since you turned it off, or a year or two years!  We keep all your data in one place, for as long a you need.  It will be right there waiting whenever you re-activate your account.

3. How does it work?

Once you sign up for the Monthly Plan, you will be charged (either $49 or $59) each month.  This is a recurring amount that will automatically be charged every month on the date you signed up.

After you have reached the 6 month mark, you will have the option of pausing your subscription.

How do you do that?  Login > Notifications panel > Monthly Subscription Status/Options > Cancel Subscription  (do not be alarmed, the “cancel” acts as a “pause”).  Click HERE for visual instructions.

When you’re ready to re-activate your account, just login with your existing email and password, and click back on the Monthly Plan.  You’ll regain instant access to your account.

4. How do I sign up for a Monthly Plan?

Signing up is easy!

If you’re new to us, just go to our Pricing page and select either the $49 or $59 Plan.

If you have an Expired Free Trial account, login with your Trial Email, and select either $49 or $59 Plan.

If you’re an Expired Online User, login with your User Email, and select either $49 or $59 Plan.

If you’re an Expired Disc-only User from a few years ago, you will need to open a new Online account.  Just go to our Pricing page and select either the $49 or $59 Plan.

MonthlyPrices

If you’d like to see a Cost Comparison for the Monthly Plans, click HERE

5. How do I “pause” my subscription?

After you have signed up, and fulfilled the required 6 month minimum term, you can then pause.  Click HERE to see how.

6. Reactivating an account after pausing subscription:

If you’ve “paused” your subscription and are ready to reactivate, it’s easy:   Just login with the same exact email and password that you had already been using, no matter how brief or long you’ve been away.  You will be given the opportunity to renew.

Reactivating your account will initiate automatic recurring charges each month.  It is up to you to pause your subscription again.

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday/IA Seminars, Saturday & Sunday:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

 

National Aviation Day

It’s National Aviation Day, and we have a lot to celebrate!

Photo from: NASA’s National Aviation Day. “It’s an exciting time for aviation, with potential NASA X-planes on the horizon and a lot of new technologies that are making airplanes much more Earth friendly. Use National Aviation Day to excite and inspire the young people you know about exploring aeronautics as a future career.” Credits: NASA / Maria C. Werries

Taken from NASA’s Tips, we highlight the reasons to celebrate the day:

“Look! Up in the sky. It’s a bird. It’s a plane. It’s… National Aviation Day!

Ever since 1939, August 19 (this coming Friday) has been celebrated as National Aviation Day, the legacy of a presidential proclamation first made by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Selected because it was Orville Wright’s birthday, the decision to revel in all things aeronautical came at an exciting time in aviation history.

Just 36 years after the Wright Brothers flew the first heavier-than-air flying machine in 1903, aviation was a growing – if not thriving – industry in the United States and around the world.

New world speed and distance records were being set, airlines that still exist today were being formed and, as World War II began, both Allied and Axis Powers sought new ways to beef up aviation’s role in warfare.

By 1939, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (N.A.C.A.) – NASA’s organizational predecessor – was 24 years old and already well established with the nation’s premiere aviation research laboratory in Virginia, and a brand new center just approved to be built in California.

Fundamental problems with flight were being solved on the drawing boards and in the wind tunnels of the N.A.C.A., enabling aircraft to fly faster, higher, farther and with more and more cargo and passengers.

Today, with the N.A.C.A.’s research heritage still alive and well at NASA, it can be said that every U.S. aircraft and air traffic control tower in operation today uses some kind of NASA-developed technology.

Post your pictures telling us #WhereIsOrville starting on August 19. Credits: NASA / Marshall Murphy

Tomorrow’s aviation scene will look even more impressive as NASA’s aeronautical innovators refine existing designs and take advantage of new technology to make aviation greener by reducing fuel use and emissions and lowering noise levels.

The nation’s aeronautical research agency also is embarking on a 10-year plan called New Aviation Horizons that will see NASA field a number of experimental aircraft – X-planes – in order to demonstrate 21st century ideas for flight.

That’s a lot to celebrate any time of the year, but especially on National Aviation Day. So how can you get in on the party in the sky? Here are some ideas worth taking off with:

Print this “NASA’s with you when you fly” flier to help you identify the NASA-developed technologies on board an airplane.

1. Show us “Where is Orville?”

Thanks to aviation, we can fly anywhere in the world, and so can Orville the Squirrel, NASA Aeronautics’ official mascot. You can help us show how Orville gets around by downloading his picture, printing it and then taking a selfie with Orville wherever you are. There’s even a spot where you can write in the location. The place doesn’t have to be aviation-oriented, but a few pictures of Orville at an airport or next to an airplane would be fun. Once you have your image, share it on social media and include #WhereIsOrville in your post. Downloadable Orville Sign and Full Instructions

2. Remember that NASA is with you when you fly.

Heading to an airport soon? See an airplane flying overhead? Next time you do either, think about NASA. Why? Well it might not be immediately visible, but every U.S. aircraft and air traffic control tower in operation today use some kind of NASA-developed technology. It’s true.

Modern airplanes are filled with the results of NASA research. A great example is “winglets” – the vertical extensions at the tips of some wings invented by NASA during the 1970s that reduce drag, fuel use and noise.

Another example can be seen on the jet engines powering Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner. Those sawtooth-shaped edges near the engine’s exhaust nozzle are called “chevrons.” They help cut noise in half at cruising altitude by adjusting air flow at the back of the engines.

Want more? If you can, sneak a glance at the cockpit on your next air trip. See all the electronic displays? They make up what’s called a “glass cockpit.” NASA did early testing on using the displays to replace heavier and outdated dials and gauges.

Dozens of more examples are hidden throughout the airplanes, airports, and control towers that exist to keep air travel moving through the National Airspace System in a way that reduces delays and is as Earth friendly as possible.

Print this NASA technology “checklist” and take it with you!

3. Follow what we’re doing to transform aviation.

NASA’s aeronautical innovators are working to transform air transportation to meet the future needs of the global aviation community. Sounds like a big job, right? It is and there are many ways in which NASA is doing this. Improving an airplane’s aerodynamics, reducing the amount of fuel used by airplanes, making airplanes of all sizes quieter, decreasing the amount of harmful emissions released into the atmosphere, working with the Federal Aviation Administration to improve the efficiency of air traffic control – the list could go on and on.

To stay current with all the news, bookmark the NASA Aeronautics home page, follow us on Twitter @NASAaero, and “like” our NASA Aeronautics Facebook page.

4. Watch an aviation-themed movie.

There’s no shortage of classic aviation-themed movies available to watch in whatever format (Blu-ray/DVD, streaming online, in the theater, etc.), from whatever source (Red Box, Netflix, your own library, etc.), and with whatever snacks (popcorn, nachos, Sno-Caps, etc.) are your favorite. We dare not attempt a comprehensive list because we wouldn’t be able to satisfy everyone’s tastes, but a few NASA aeronautics staff favorites include Jimmy Stewart’s “The Spirit of St. Louis,” Disney’s “Planes,” the documentary “One Six Right: The Romance of Flying,” and the recent National Geographic IMAX spectacle “Living in the Age of Airplanes.” (Check out some science, engineering and math activities in this educator resource guide NASA produced for the film.)

5. Explore the science, tech, engineering and math of flight.

Is your child curious about how things work? Does she or he like to work with tools and build things and organize friends to get things done?

We have a large selection of hands-on activities that you could download and work on yourselves with your children about the history of flight, parts of an airplane, the principles of flight, propulsion, and the airspace (weather, noise, pollution).

See full list of activities.

6. Visit your local science museum or NASA visitor center.

Exhibits about aviation and on how an airplane flies are popular staples of local science museums. Check out your local science center to see how they handle aviation, and even if they don’t, it never hurts to spend some time learning about science. And if you live within a short drive of Norfolk, VA; Cleveland, OH; or San Francisco, CA, you might consider checking out the visitor centers associated with NASA’s Langley Research Center, Glenn Research Center, or Ames Research Center, respectively. These major NASA field centers play host to the majority of NASA’s aeronautics research. (NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center, the fourth of NASA’s aeronautics centers, is located within the restricted area of Edwards Air Force Base, CA, so they do not have a public visitor center.)

7. Take an introductory flight lesson.

Pilots will tell you there is a wonderful sense of freedom in flying, not to mention the incredible views and the personal sense of accomplishment that comes from mastering the skills required to fly. At the same time being a pilot is not for everyone – but you won’t know unless you try! Most general aviation airports in the nation have a flight school that offers an introductory flight lesson at a discounted price. Many airports have flying clubs that will introduce you to flight. You also might check to see if there is a Civil Air Patrol in your area. And if you want a taste of flight without leaving the ground, computer desktop flight simulators such as Microsoft Flight Simulator X or X-Plane 10 are popular choices and can get you into the virtual sky in short order.

Paper airplanes are effective, inexpensive ways to get kids to experiment with aerodynamics. There are many free designs online or try creating the look of one of our future X-planes.
Credits: NASA / Lillian Gipson

8. Build an airplane

Why not? It doesn’t have to be big enough to actually fly in – although homebuilt airplane kits are available if you have the money, time and perseverance to complete the job. Putting together a smaller plastic model kit of one of the world’s most historic aircraft can be just as rewarding and just as educational, especially for younger kids who might be thinking about a career as an engineer or aerospace technician. In fact, many astronauts will tell you their love of aviation and space began with putting models together as a child.

Another idea: Grab some LEGO bricks and build the airplane of your dreams, or perhaps one based on real NASA work like one of our possible X-planes.

Or make it easy on yourself, fold a paper airplane and shoot it across the room. Sometimes simple works best. There are many free, fold-able paper airplane designs available online.

9. Visit your local library or download a NASA e-book.

Aviation-themed books, whether fact or fiction, are all over the shelves of your local library – literally. That’s because there’s no single Dewey Decimal number for aviation. A book about aviation history will be in a different section of the library than a book about how to design an airplane. And fictional books such as the Arthur Hailey classic “Airport,” or autobiographies such as Chuck Yeager’s “Yeager,” are off on yet another shelf somewhere else. Don’t hesitate to ask your reference librarian for help. And when you get back from the library, or while still there, jump online and check out the NASA e-books you can download for free.

Get excited again about aviation! There are some really cool things happening. Watch this short video.

NASA’s “Accelerating to New Aviation Horizons” Video

Last Updated: Aug. 6, 2017 Editor: Lillian Gipson”

 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 

Join us here at Zook Aviation as we celebrate all the progress in aviation!

FAA’s Guidelines on Getting ADS-B Equipped

“SEE and BE SEEN!”                                                  
Read the FAA’s guide on getting ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast) equipped.
 

 

There is a deadline of:  January 1, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

FAA’s site on ADS-B Interactive Map, Equip Info and Quick Links:

https://www.faa.gov/nextgen/programs/adsb/

 

 

Starting January 1, 2020, you must be equipped with ADS-B.  Out to fly in most controlled airspace. Learn More.

 

There’s a General Aviation ADS-B REBATE Program the FAA has made available.  Here are the Steps to go through to Claim your Rebate.

https://www.faa.gov/nextgen/equipadsb/rebate/

Be sure to follow the Checklist to follow the requirements.  All actions MUST be complete before claiming your Rebate:

https://adsbrebate.faa.gov/RebateClaim.aspx

– – – – – – – – – – – – – 

 

Download the Android App here:

 

 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.airportnetwork.ADSBVR

– – – – – – – – – – – – – 

If you need more information, please visit the FAA’s website for further details, call (202) 267-8790 or email them at: adsb@faa.gov.

Use the “Scratch Pad” While Reading the AD

Did you know you can use the “Scratch Pad” to record your notes while reading an AD that is listed in your Report?

The “Scratch Pad” is conveniently located to the left side of the AD document, so you can read the AD, and take notes at the same time.

Remember to click the Save & Return to Report button.

 

 

You will see that the text written in the “Scratch Pad” will transfer over into the Date/Hrs, Next Due & MOC (Method of Compliance) fields in your AD Report.  You can make changes to your notes at anytime, just remember to hit the SAVE button!

– – – – – – – – – – – – – 

Have more questions?  Contact Us or visit www.AirworthinessDirectives.com

Remember to like and follow our Facebook page!

Mobile Device and Cross Platform Compatible

Did you know?  … the AD Toolbox Online is Mobile Device and Cross Platform Compatible

We’re often asked:

      • “Does it work on an iPad or Tablet?”
      • “Can I use it on a Mac?”
      • “Do I have to dedicate a specific Computer to it?”
      • “Can I use it on my Phone?”
      • “In the Office, Shop, Truck or away from Home?”

The AD Toolbox Online is mobile compatible, works on any device, any operating system (OS), and anywhere there is an internet connection.

      • Mac or PC
      • Phone, Tablet, Laptop, Desktop
      • Android or Apple

Through any Internet connection:

      • Wifi
      • HotSpot
      • Satellite
      • Land Line / Hard-wired Cable

And on any Browser:

      • Chrome
      • FireFox
      • Internet Explorer
      • Edge
      • Safari
      • and others

You do not have to dedicate any particular device to the use of our online service.  Just login to the website and you have instant access to your records, anytime, anywhere, on any device!

Sign-up for a 10-Day FREE Trial and give it a spin:

AD Toolbox Online 10-Day Free Trial

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

Recurring ADs

How do you know if an AD is Recurring, or not?

Look under the Recurring column of your AD Report:

      • Yes* – This means that the AD is recurring but a specific action in the AD terminates the recurring requirement.
      • Yes – This means that the AD is recurring.
      • If the recurring column is blank, this means the AD is NOT recurring.

These fields can be modified, so you can remove the word Yes or Yes*.

If the field is blank, but the AD is recurring to you, then you can type in the word “Yes” or even state the frequency, such as “100hrs”.  Be sure to click the green SAVE button!

If you want to view only the Recurring ADs, click the orange “Show Recurring Only” button.  When you are finished viewing them, you can go back up to the same button and click “Show All” to get back to the full Report.

If you’d like to Print Recurring Only, here are the instructions:

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Have more questions? Need help? Contact Us

Monday thru Thursday: Open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, Saturday, Sunday & IA Seminars:  The office is Closed. Calls, voicemails and emails will be responded to within a reasonable amount of time.

What Can You Get in 1 Click?

With the AD Toolbox Online, sometimes there are some great features that are only just 1 click away!  Below, we’ll show you some of the useful tools that make using the AD Toolbox even more convenient.

Have you ever performed an Annual Inspection on the same plane a year later?  Of course!   In just a click, you can make an Updated Copy and instantly add all the new ADs that have been issued since you last created or opened a specific AD Report. Open your Report and click the Update with New ADs button.  Instructions here:

https://zookaviation.com/blog/2018/09/05/update-an-old-ad-report/

Would you like to review ALL the activity you’ve created for a specific Customer?  If so, just click on their profile and you will see all AD Reports, Forms, Work Order, Invoices, Logbook Stickers, and anything else that is assigned to that specific Customer.

Curious about ALL the Regulatory Documents that apply to a specific Airframe, or Tail Number?  Whenever you see the “nFo” button, click on it and you will see all the ADs, STCs, TCDs, SBs, AMAs , and more.

nFo”  is a quick snapshot of all documents that apply to that specific airframe model.

You can even run a Filter Search one ONE screen for:  SBs, STCs and AMAs!

 

With 1 click, you can create either a Logbook Sticker, or an Invoice directly from a Work Order.

What else can you get with 1 Click?

  • The most current ADs – which are updated daily.
  • Instant access to your most recent activity, including:  AD Reports, Forms, Work Order and Service Invoices.
  • Your Billing History
  • Submit a Comment, Question or Concern
  • Visit our Help Blog
  • Follow our Facebook page for the most current Updates

– – – – – – – – – – – – – 

Have more questions?  Contact Us or visit www.AirworthinessDirectives.com

Remember to like and follow our Facebook page!